Apr 28

Blue Öyster Cult – Agents Of Fortune (1976/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/192 kHz | Time – 36:30 minutes | 1,3 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Artwork: Front cover | © Columbia/Legacy

Agents of Fortune is the fourth studio album by American hard rock band Blue Öyster Cult, originally released in a gatefold sleeve LP in 1976 through Columbia Records.

The platinum-selling album peaked at No. 29 on Billboard’s Pop Albums chart,while the single “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” peaked at No. 12 on the Pop Singles chart,making it Blue Öyster Cult’s biggest hit.

The band also became a larger concert attraction at this time—largely based on not only their stageshow, but aided by the airplay of “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper,” which to this day is a staple of FM rock station playlists. Concert venues became larger, the show became more intricate and BÖC was reaching its commercial peak on the tour circuit.

If ever there were a manifesto for 1970s rock, one that prefigured both the decadence of the decade’s burgeoning heavy metal and prog rock excesses and the rage of punk rock, “This Ain’t the Summer of Love,” the opening track from Agents of Fortune, Blue Öyster Cult’s fourth album, was it. The irony was that while the cut itself came down firmly on the hard rock side of the fence, most of the rest of the album didn’t. Agents of Fortune was co-produced by longtime Cult record boss Sandy Pearlman, Murray Krugman, and newcomer David Lucas, and in addition, the band’s lyric writing was being done internally with help from poet-cum-rocker Patti Smith (who also sings on “The Revenge of Vera Gemini”). Pearlman, a major contributor to the band’s songwriting output, received a solitary credit while critic Richard Meltzer, whose words were prevalent on the Cult’s previous outings, was absent. The album yielded the band’s biggest single with “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper,” a multi-textured, deeply melodic soft rock song with psychedelic overtones, written by guitarist Donald “Buck Dharma” Roeser. The rest of the album is ambitious in that it all but tosses aside the Cult’s proto-metal stance and instead recontextualizes their entire stance. It’s still dark, mysterious, and creepy, and perhaps even more so, it’s still rooted in rock posturing and excess, but gone is the nihilistic biker boogie in favor of a more tempered – indeed, nearly pop arena rock – sound that gave Allen Lanier’s keyboards parity with Dharma’s guitar roar, as evidenced by “E.T.I.,” “Debbie Denise,” and “True Confessions.” This is not to say that the Cult abandoned their adrenaline rock sound entirely. Cuts like “Tattoo Vampire” and “Sinful Love” have plenty of feral wail in them. Ultimately, Agents of Fortune is a solid record, albeit a startling one for fans of the band’s earlier sound. It also sounds like one of restless inspiration, which is, in fact, what it turned out to be given the recordings that came after. It turned out to be the Cult’s last consistent effort until they released Fire of Unknown Origin in 1981.

Tracklist:
01 – This Ain’t the Summer of Love
02 – True Confessions
03 – (Don’t Fear) The Reaper
04 – E.T.I. (Extra Terrestrial Intelligence)
05 – The Revenge of Vera Gemini
06 – Sinful Love
07 – Tattoo Vampire
08 – Morning Final
09 – Tenderloin
10 – Debbie Denise

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Apr 28

Blue Öyster Cult – On Your Feet Or On Your Knees (1975/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 1:16:23 minutes | 1,64 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Artwork: Front cover | © MCMG

On Your Feet or on Your Knees, Blue Öyster Cult’s first live album (there would be two more), was also their first to peak inside the Top 40 best-sellers, which is more of an indication of the audience the group was building up through extensive touring than of its quality. Songs that had a tight, concentrated impact on studio albums got elongated here, and that impact was dissipated. And the song selection left a great deal to be desired if this was to be a fitting summation of the band’s career so far. Perhaps by their 1974 tour, BÖC had dropped such classics from their first album as “Transmaniacon MC,” and “Stairway to the Stars,” but the less impressive material from the third album was no substitute. The album did mark the first commercial release of a version of “Buck’s Boogie” as well as covers of the Yardbirds’ “I Ain’t Got You” and Steppenwolf’s “Born to Be Wild”.

Tracklist:
01 – The Subhuman
02 – Harvester of Eyes
03 – Hot Rail to Hell
04 – The Red and the Black
05 – 7 Screaming Diz-Busters
06 – Buck’s Boogie
07 – (Then Came The) Last Days of May
08 – Cities On Flame
09 – M.E. 262
10 – Before the Kiss (A Recap)
11 – Maserati GT (I Ain’t Got You)
12 – Born to Be Wild

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Apr 28

Blue Öyster Cult – Secret Treaties (1974/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 38:24 minutes | 883 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Artwork: Front cover | © Columbia/Legacy

Secret Treaties is the third studio album by the American hard rock band Blue Öyster Cult, released in 1974 by Columbia Records. Secret Treaties is regarded by many fans and critics alike as Blue Öyster Cult’s best album. The album spent 14 weeks in the US album charts, peaking at No. 53.It was declared gold by the RIAA in 1992.

While the speed-freak adrenaline heaviness and shrouded occult mystery of Tyranny and Mutation is the watermark for Blue Öyster Cult’s creative invention, it is Secret Treaties that is widely and critically regarded as the band’s classic. Issued in 1974, Secret Treaties is the purest distillation of all of BÖC’s strengths. Here the songs are expansive, and lush in their textures. The flamboyance is all here, and so are the overdriven guitar riffs provided by Buck Dharma and Eric Bloom. But there is something else, texturally, that moves these songs out from the blackness and into the shadows. Perhaps it’s the bottom-heavy mix by producer and lyricist Sandy Pearlman, with Allen Lanier’s electric piano and Joe Bouchard’s bass coming to rest in an uneasy balance with the twin-guitar attack. Perhaps it’s in the tautness of songwriting and instrumental architectures created by drummer Albert Bouchard, Bloom, and Don Roeser (Buck Dharma). Whatever it is, it offers the Cult a new depth and breadth. While elements of psychedelia have always been a part of the band’s sound, it was always enfolded in proto-metal heaviness and biker boogie. Here, BÖC created their own brand of heavy psychedelic noir to diversify their considerably aggressive attack. Listen to “Subhuman” or “Dominance and Submission.” Their minor chord flourishes and multi-tracked layered guitars and Bouchard’s constantly shimmering cymbals and snare work (he is the most underrated drummer in rock history) and elliptical lyrics – that Pearlman put out in front of the mix for a change – added to the fathomless dread and mystery at the heart of the music. Elsewhere, on “Cagey Cretins” and “Harvester of Eyes” (both with lyrics by critic Richard Meltzer), the razor-wire guitar riffs were underscored by Lanier’s organ, and their sci-fi urgency heightened by vocal harmonies. But it is on “Flaming Telepaths,” with its single-chord hypnotic piano line that brings the lyric “Well, I’ve opened up my veins too many times/And the poison’s in my heart in my heart and in my mind/Poison’s in my bloodstream/Poison’s in my pride/I’m after rebellion/I’ll settle for lives/Is it any wonder that my mind is on fire?” down into the maelstrom and wreaks havoc on the listener. It’s a stunner, full of crossing guitar lines and an insistent, demanding rhythmic throb. The set closes with the quark strangeness of “Astronomy,” full of melancholy, dread, and loss that leaves the listener unsettled and in an entirely new terrain, having traveled a long way from the boasting rockery of “Career of Evil” that began the journey. It’s a breathless rock monolith that is all dark delight and sinister pleasure. While the Cult went on to well-deserved commercial success with Agents of Fortune an album later, the freaky inspiration that was offered on their debut, and brought to shine like a black jewel on Tyranny and Mutation, was fully articulated as visionary on Secret Treaties.

Tracklist:
01 – Career of Evil
02 – Subhuman
03 – Dominance and Submission
04 – ME 262
05 – Cagey Cretins
06 – Harvester of Eyes
07 – Flaming Telepaths
08 – Astronomy

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Apr 28

Blue Öyster Cult – Tyranny And Mutation (1973/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 38:04 minutes | 889 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Artwork: Front cover | © Columbia/Legacy

Tyranny and Mutation (known on the album cover as THE BLVE ÖYSTER CVLT: TYRANNY AND MVTATION) is the second studio album by the American hard rock band Blue Öyster Cult, released on February 11, 1973 by Columbia Records.

On Tyranny and Mutation, Blue Öyster Cult achieved the seemingly impossible: they brightened their sound and deepened their mystique. The band picked up their tempos considerably on this sophomore effort, and producers Sandy Pearlman and Murray Krugman added a lightning bolt of high-end sonics to their frequency range. Add to this the starling lyrical contributions of Pearlman, rock critic Richard Meltzer, and poet-cum-rocker Patti Smith (who was keyboardist Allen Lanier’s girlfriend at the time), the split imagery of Side One’s thematic, “The Red” and Side Two’s “The Black,” and the flip-to-wig-city, dark conspiracy of Gawlik’s cover art, and an entire concept was not only born and executed, it was received. The Black side of Tyranny and Mutation is its reliance on speed, punched-up big guitars, and throbbing riffs such as in “The Red and the Black,” “O.D’d on Life Itself,” “Hot Rails to Hell,” and “7 Screaming Diz-Busters,” all of which showcased the biker boogie taken to a dizzyingly extreme boundary; one where everything flies by in a dark blur, and the articulations of that worldview are informed as much by atmosphere as idea. This is screaming, methamphetamine-fueled rock & roll that was all about attitude, mystery, and a sense of nihilistic humor that was deep in the cuff. Here was the crossroads: the middle of rock’s Bermuda triangle where BÖC marked the black cross of the intersection between New York’s other reigning kings of mystery theater and absurd excess: the Velvet Underground and Kiss – two years before their first album – and the ” ‘it’s all F#$&%* so who gives a rat’s ass” attitude that embodied the City’s punk chic half-a-decade later. On the Red Side, beginning with the syncopated striations of “Baby Ice Dog,” in which Allen Lanier’s piano was as important as Buck Dharma’s guitar throb, elements of ambiguity and bluesy swagger enter into the mix. Eric Bloom was the perfect frontman: he twirled the words around in his mouth before spitting them out with requisite piss-and-vinegar, and a sense of decadent dandy that underscored the music’s elegance, as well as its power. He was at ease whether the topic was necromancy, S&M, apocalyptic warfare, or cultural dissolution. By the LP’s end, on “Mistress of the Salmon Salt,” Bloom was being covered over by a kind of aggressively architected psychedelia that kept the ’60s at bay while embracing the more aggressive, tenser nature of the times. While BÖC’s Secret Treaties is widely recognized as the Cult’s classic album, one would do well to consider Tyranny and Mutation in the same light.

Tracklist:
01 – The Red & the Black
02 – O.D.’d On Life Itself
03 – Hot Rails to Hell
04 – 7 Screaming Diz-Busters
05 – Baby Ice Dog
06 – Wings Wetted Down
07 – Teen Archer
08 – Mistress of the Salmon Salt (Quicklime Girl)

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Apr 28

Blue Öyster Cult – Blue Öyster Cult (1972/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 36:42 minutes | 823 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Artwork: Front cover | © Columbia/Legacy

Blue Öyster Cult is the eponymous debut studio album by the American hard rock band Blue Öyster Cult, released on January 16, 1972 by Columbia Records. The album featured songs such as “Cities on Flame with Rock and Roll”, “Stairway to the Stars”, and “Then Came the Last Days of May”, all of which the band still plays regularly during its concerts. Despite positive reviews, the album failed to chart for some time before finally cracking the Billboard 200 on May 20, 1972, peaking at No. 172.Blue Öyster Cult toured with artists such as The Byrds, Alice Cooper and the Mahavishnu Orchestra to support the album.

Two years before Kiss roared out of Long Island with its self-titled debut, Blue Öyster Cult, the latest incarnation of a band assembled by guitarist Donald “Buck Dharma” Roeser and drummer Albert Bouchard in 1967, issued its dark, eponymously-titled heavy rock monolith. Managed and produced by the astronomically minded and conspiratorially haunted Sandy Pearlman, BÖC rode the hot, hellbound rails of blistering hard rock as pioneered by Steppenwolf, fierce mutated biker blues, and a kind of dark psychedelia that could have only come out New York. The band’s debut relied heavily on the lyrics of Pearlman and rock critic Richard Meltzer, as well as Pearlman’s pioneering production that layered guitars in staggered sheets of sound over a muddy mix that kept Eric Bloom’s delivery in the middle of the mix and made it tough to decipher. This was on purpose – to draw the listener into the songs cryptically and ambiguously. From the opener, “Transmaniacon MC,” the listener knew something very different was afoot. This is dark, amphetamine-fueled occult music that relied on not one, but three guitars – Bloom and keyboardist Allen Lanier added their own parts to Roeser’s incessant riffing: a barely audible upright piano keeping the changes rooted in early rock and the blues, and a rhythm attack by Bouchard and his brother Joe on bass that was barely contained inside the tune’s time signature. From the next track on “I’m on the Lamb But I Ain’t No Sheep,” elliptical lyrics talked about “the red and the black,” while darkening themselves with stunning riffs and crescendos that were as theatrical as they were musical, and insured the Cult notice among the other acts bursting out of the seams of post-’60’s rock. Other standouts include the cosmic “Stairway to the Stars,” the boogie rave-up “Before the Kiss, a Redcap,” that sounded like a mutant Savoy Brown meeting Canned Heat at Altamont. But it is on “Cities on Flame With Rock & Roll,” that the Cult’s sinister plan for world domination is best displayed. From its knotty, overdriven riff to its rhythm guitar vamp, Vox organ shimmer, its crash cymbal ride and plodding bass and drum slog through the changes – not to mention its title – it is the ultimate in early metal anthems. Add to this the swirling quizzicality of “Workshop of the Telescopes” that lent the band some of its image cred.

Tracklist:
01 – Transmaniacon MC
02 – I’m On the Lamb But I Ain’t No Sheep
03 – Then Came the Last Days of May
04 – Stairway to the Stars
05 – Before the Kiss, a Redcap
06 – Screams
07 – She’s as Beautiful as a Foot
08 – Cities On Flame with Rock and Roll
09 – Workshop of the Telescopes
10 – Redeemed

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Apr 28

Cœur de Pirate – Child of Light (2014)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 00:49:56 minutes | 525 MB | Genre: Score
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: musique.coeurdepirate.com | Artwork: Front Cover

Coeur de Pirate is a Québécoise singer/songwriter and pianist who made her acclaimed eponymous album debut in 2008 and eventually rose to Top Five success in France the following year with her smash hit single “Comme des Enfants.” Born Beatrice Martin on September 22, 1989, in Quebec, Canada, she began playing piano at age three and was educated in Montreal. She began her recording career in 2007, posting demo versions of her songs on MySpace. Around this same time, she began playing keyboards in the acclaimed Montreal-based indie pop band Bonjour Brumaire. As a solo artist, she made her full-length album debut in 2008 with the eponymous album Coeur de Pirate on the label Grosse Boîte. While the album was championed right away by indie pop scenesters in Quebec, it caught on more steadily from a commercial standpoint and was given a big boost when photographer Francis Vachon used the album track “Ensemble” in a YouTube video that became a viral hit on the Internet. Nominated for Francophone Album of the Year at the 2009 Juno Awards, Coeur de Pirate was released in France in 2009 in association with Universal Music. It became a big hit there, reaching the Top Ten of the French albums chart for several weeks in summer 2009 and spawning the Top Five hit single “Comme des Enfants.” The French version of Coeur de Pirate features a duet with Nouvelle Star season five winner Julien Doré on the song “Pour un Infidèle” whereas the Canadian version features a duet with Jimmy Hunt. In addition to her solo work as Coeur de Pirate, Martin founded Pearls, an English-language side project that made its debut on MySpace. Another collaboration, Armistice, featured Bedouin Soundclash’s Jay Malinowski and members of the Bronx; the group released an EP in 2011. Late that year, Coeur de Pirate’s second album Blonde arrived. Martin announced she was pregnant in February 2012, giving birth to a daughter that September. For a while afterward, Martin focused on soundtrack work, writing music for Radio-Canada’s medical TV drama Trauma in 2013 and the Ubisoft video game Child of Light in 2014. The following year, she returned with Roses, the first Coeur de Pirate album to feature half its songs in English and half in French. In 2016, she performed in Les Souliers Rouges, a musical retelling of Michael Powell’s film The Red Shoes that also featured songs written and performed by Marc Lavoine and Arthur H, and music by composer Fabrice Aboulker. ~ Jason Birchmeier

Tracklist:

01. Cœur de pirate – Pilgrims on a Long Journey 03:31
02. Cœur de pirate – Aurora’s Theme 03:28
03. Cœur de pirate – Magna’s Heart 02:35
04. Cœur de pirate – Jupiter’s Lightning 02:07
05. Cœur de pirate – Final Breath 02:04
06. Cœur de pirate – Patches of Sky 03:18
07. Cœur de pirate – Dark Creatures 02:05
08. Cœur de pirate – Little Girl, Gen 02:48
09. Cœur de pirate – Bolmus Populi 01:29
10. Cœur de pirate – Leave Your Castle 03:51
11. Cœur de pirate – Metal Gleamed in the Twilight 04:35
12. Cœur de pirate – Funeral Dirge 00:46
13. Cœur de pirate – Down to a Dusty Plain 02:56
14. Cœur de pirate – Woods Darker than Night 02:12
15. Cœur de pirate – Path of the Eclipse 02:23
16. Cœur de pirate – Hymn of Light 04:38
17. Cœur de pirate – Victory 00:38
18. Cœur de pirate – Off to Sleep 04:25

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Apr 28

Clark Terry – One On One (2002)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 56:09 minutes | 1,13 GB | Genre: Jazz, Bop
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks.com | Digital Booklet | © Chesky Records

All recorded with a single microphone, the artists appear right before you with this spacious, lush and multi-dimensional Chesky Records sampler. Now headphone users will hear the same three-dimensional sound and imaging as audiophiles have for the past 25 years with Chesky Recordings. Also these new Binaural+ Series albums capture even more spatial realism for the home audiophile market, bringing you one step closer to the actual event. You will hear some of the most natural and pure music ever recorded.

Right in the middle of celebrating his 79th birthday, Clark Terry went into the studio for several days to record 14 duets with a different pianist on each track, with many of them being veterans of many record dates and/or concerts with him. Terry remains one of the most easily identifiable trumpeters and flügelhorn players in jazz, so much so that more than one critic has claimed the ability to identify him after just one note. Each track is dedicated to a great performer of the past, though no attempt is made to copy famous recordings, of course. Terry’s brilliant flügelhorn swings mightily along with Monty Alexander on the surprising dedication to Nat King Cole of “L.O.V.E.,” which was a hit for him after Cole had all but quit playing piano and enjoyed even greater success as a popular singer. The choice of Lil Hardin Armstrong’s “Just for a Thrill” is also an interesting one, versus her better known “Struttin’ With Some Barbecue”; Terry’s fat tone on his big horn is well complemented by Geri Allen. Terry scats an imitation of brushes on cymbals to introduce “Swingin’ the Blues” with Junior Mance before switching to muted trumpet. Old friend Marian McPartland works with Terry to produce a mesmerizing rendition of “Skylark.” Also present are Sir Roland Hanna, Kenny Barron, John Lewis, Barry Harris, Tommy Flanagan, Don Friedman, Billy Taylor, Benny Green, Eric Reed, and Eric Lewis. There is not one performance that rates less than excellent within this very highly recommended CD. ~ AllMusic

Tracklist
01. L.O.V.E. (00:05:09)
02. Just For A Thrill (00:04:29)
03. Liza All the CLouds’ll Roll (00:03:40)
04. Intimacy of the Blues (00:04:05)
05. You Can Depend On Me (00:03:21)
06. Memories of You (00:04:51)
07. Honeysuckle Rose (00:08:08)
08. Willow Grove (00:03:58)
09. Solitude (00:05:32)
10. Blue Monk (00:04:06)
11. Misty (00:06:53)
12. Swingin’ the Blues (00:03:48)
13. Jungle Blues (00:03:35)
14. Skylark (00:04:25)

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Apr 28

Chamber Soloists of the RPO – Mozart: Wind Serenades (2007)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/88,2 kHz | Time – 71:14 minutes | 1,14 GB | Genre: Classical
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: naimlabel.com | Artwork: Front cover | © Naim Records

The Viennese newspapers of 23 March 1784 announced a concert at the Imperial Royal National Court Theatre to be given by the clarinettist Anton Stadler, ‘at which, among other well chosen pieces, a large wind work of a very special kind composed by Herr Mozart will be performed’. A member of the audience, Johann Friedrich Schink, listed the thirteen instruments in his diary and noted that ‘at each instrument sat a master – oh, what an effect it made – glorious and grand, excellent and sublime!’ Although Schink heard only four movements, this must have been the Serenade in B flat, K361. (The misspelt title ‘Gran Partitta’ and the erroneous date ‘1780′ were added to Mozart’s manuscript by an unknown hand.) Mozart was a close friend of Anton Stadler, and later wrote the Clarinet Concerto and Quintet for him: in his honour, Mozart augmented the basic ‘Harmonie’ octet with a second pair of horns, two basset-horns and a string bass (or contrabassoon), thus creating this ‘large wind work of a very special kind’. We do not know which four movements Schink heard; nor do we know when, or for what occasion, the remaining three movements were added.

An impressive slow introduction establishes the first clarinet’s leading role from the opening bars, and leads to a fully worked-out monothematic sonata movement on a symphonic scale. The Minuet which follows has two contrasting Trios; the first Trio is a showcase for the pairs of clarinets and basset-horns (the basset-horn is an alto clarinet with an extended lower register).

The third movement, Adagio, sets up a gently throbbing syncopated pulse over which a long melody is unhurriedly unfolded by oboe, clarinet and basset-horn in turn. The second Minuet again has two contrasting Trios; then follows a Romance, a hymn-like Adagio in triple time, interrupted by a stormy minor-key middle section with busy passage-work for bassoons.

The ‘Theme with Variations’ constitutes the most substantial section of the work. It started life in a very different guise, as a movement of a C major Quartet for flute and strings (K285b) of 1778; in translating it to the larger forces of the wind ensemble, Mozart endows this apparently featherweight piece with a magical range of tone-colours – most memorably in the fifth variation, in which the clarinets and basset-horns lay down a soft carpet of undulating demisemiquavers to support the oboe’s melodic line.

The boisterous Rondo finale provides an exhilarating release of tension; all the instruments in turn are given a last opportunity for virtuoso display before the final headlong dash to the finishing line.

Tracklist:
01 – I Allegro (Serenade No. 12 in C Minor K388 ‘Nacht Musique’)
02 – II Andante (Serenade No. 12 in C Minor K388 ‘Nacht Musique’)
03 – III Menuetto in Canone (Serenade No. 12 in C Minor K388 ‘Nacht Musique’)
04 – IV Allegro (Serenade No. 12 in C Minor K388 ‘Nacht Musique’)
05 – I Largo (Serenade No. 10 in B Flat Major K361 ‘Gran Partita’)
06 – II Menuetto (Serenade No. 10 in B Flat Major K361 ‘Gran Partita’)
07 – III Adagio (Serenade No. 10 in B Flat Major K361 ‘Gran Partita’)
08 – IV Menuetto – Allegretto (Serenade No. 10 in B Flat Major K361 ‘Gran Partita’)
09 – V Romanze – Adagio (Serenade No. 10 in B Flat Major K361 ‘Gran Partita’)
10 – VI Tema con Varizioni (Serenade No. 10 in B Flat Major K361 ‘Gran Partita’)
11 – VII Rondo (Serenade No. 10 in B Flat Major K361 ‘Gran Partita’)

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Apr 28

Charlie Haden, Liberation Music Orchestra – Time / Life (2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 00:53:58 minutes | 1,05 GB | Genre: Jazz
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Digital Booklet | © Impulse Select

Time/Life centers around two live recordings—the final recordings with Charlie Haden and his Liberation Music Orchestra–from the 2011 Middelheim Festival: Haden’s 1979 composition Song for the Whales and Miles Davis’ Blue In Green, both arranged for orchestra by Carla Bley. After Haden’s death in 2014, the LMO, with the help of Carla Bley, Steve Swallow, and Ruth Cameron, recorded three works by Bley to create an album that honored Haden and his concern for the environment. This is that tribute.

Tracklist
01. Blue In Green
02. Time / Life
03. Silent Spring
04. Útviklingssang
05. Song For the Wales

Musicians
Charlie Haden – bass on 1, 5
Carla Bley – conductor, piano
Steve Swallow – electric bass on 2-4
Tony Malaby – tenor sax
Chris Cheek – tenor sax
Loren Stillman – alto sax
Michael Rodriguez – trumpet
Seneca Black – trumpet
Curtis Fowlkes – trombone
Vincent Chancey – French horn
Joseph Daley – tuba
Steve Cardenas – guitar
Matt Wilson – drums

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Apr 28

Charles Munch, Boston SO – Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique (1962/2012)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time – 49:01 minutes | 1,85 GB | Genre: Classical
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source:HDTT | Artwork: CD Artwork

…Munch and his orchestra are utterly persuasive in their view of the work and thanks to HDTT, they are with us again in wonderful, near-analogue sound. Incidentally, this 1962 version is rarely seen on a reissue, the 1956 version is the one thats almost always used….

…In any event, it became and has remained one of the most popular orchestral works in the classical repertoire. In the hands of Charles Munch and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the acknowledged mid-twentieth century leaders of French music performance, it is predictably clear, light, airy, and utterly refined. In this superbly engineered transfer from a four track RCA analogue tape (1962) made in Boston’s Symphony Hall, even in its richest instrumental sections, it literally floats before us, naturally warm and breathy. Low strings are especially present, well-defined, and full, grounding the work but without raising any Dionysian issues. This is an early nineteenth century fantasy, Munch reminds us: Freud is not yet on the scene. The famous “March to the Scaffold” takes place in splendidly bright, brass-lit sunlight. And the “Dream of the Witches’ Sabbath” is a manic olio of puckishness, melodrama, and brio, ending in one of music history’s most fulsome conclusions. It is all seemingly composed to show off the virtuosity of the orchestra, which it does in spades. It is a veritable guide to the orchestra, precursor of Britten’s nearly a century later.

Tracklist:
01 – Daydreams – Passions
02 – A ball
03 – Scene in the Country
04 – March to the Scaffold
05 – Dream of a Witches Sabbath

Source used for Transfer: Transferred from a RCA 4-track tape
Recording Info: Recorded 1962
Producer: Richard Mohr
Engineer: Robert Layton
Venue: Boston Symphony Hall

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