Jul 24

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Into the Great Wide Open (1991/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96kHz | Time – 44:01 minutes | 975 MB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | © Geffen Records
Recorded: 1990–91 at Rumbo Recorders, Studio C, Canoga Park, California and M.C. Studios

Exclusively on HDtracks, images of the master tapes are included with every download, along with a note from the remaster producer, Ryan Ulyate.

The Heartbreakers’ eighth studio album was also produced by Jeff Lynne with Tom Petty and Mike Campbell and was recorded at Rumbo Recorders in Canoga Park, CA. There were three singles released from this album: “Learning To Fly”, “Into The Great Wide Open”, and “King’’s Highway”.

Into the Great Wide Open is the eighth studio album by American rock band Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, first released in July 1991 (see 1991 in music). The album was the band’s last with MCA Records. The album was the second Petty produced with Jeff Lynne after the success of 1989’s Full Moon Fever.
The first single, “Learning to Fly”, became his joint longest-running number one single (along with “The Waiting” from 1981’s Hard Promises) on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock Tracks chart, spending six weeks at the top spot. The second single, “Out in the Cold”, also made number 1 on the Mainstream Rock chart, albeit only for two weeks.
The music video for the title song starred Johnny Depp, who had moved to Los Angeles as a teenager to seek rock stardom, along with Gabrielle Anwar, Faye Dunaway, and Matt LeBlanc.

Since Full Moon Fever was an unqualified commercial and critical success, perhaps it made sense that Tom Petty chose to follow its shiny formula when he reunited with the Heartbreakers for its follow-up, Into the Great Wide Open. Nevertheless, the familiarity of Into the Great Wide Open is something of a disappointment. the Heartbreakers’ sound has remained similar throughout their career, but they had never quite repeated themselves until here. Technically, it isn’t a repeat, since they weren’t credited on Full Moon, but Wide Open sounds exactly like Full Moon, thanks to Jeff Lynne’s overly stylized production. Again, it sounds like a cross between latter-day ELO and roots rock (much like the Traveling Wilburys, in that sense), but the production has become a touch too careful and precise, bordering on the sterile at times. And, unfortunately, the quality of the songwriting doesn’t match Full Moon or Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough). That’s not to say that it rivals the uninspired Long After Dark, since Petty was a better craftsman in 1991 than he was in 1983. There are a number of minor gems — “Learning to Fly,” “Kings Highway,” “Into the Great Wide Open” — but there are no knockouts, either; it’s like Full Moon Fever if there were only “Apartment Song”s and no “Free Fallin’”s. In other words, enough for a pleasant listen, but not enough to resonate like his best work. (And considering this, perhaps it wasn’t surprising that Petty chose to change producers and styles on his next effort, the solo Wildflowers.) —Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 Learning To Fly 04:01
2 Kings Highway 03:07
3 Into The Great Wide Open 03:42
4 Two Gunslingers 03:09
5 The Dark Of The Sun 03:23
6 All Or Nothin’ 04:05
7 All The Wrong Reasons 03:45
8 Too Good To Be True 04:01
9 Out In The Cold 03:40
10 You And I Will Meet Again 03:43
11 Makin’ Some Noise 03:27
12 Built To Last 03:58

Personnel:
Tom Petty – vocals, 6- and 12-string acoustic and electric guitars, keyboards, percussion, bass guitar, producer
Mike Campbell – lead guitar, 12-string guitar, bass guitar, Dobro, keyboards, slide guitar
Howie Epstein – bass guitar, backing vocals
Benmont Tench – acoustic and electric pianos, accordion
Stan Lynch – drums, percussion
Jeff Lynne – guitars, bass, vocals, piano, synthesizer, percussion, sound effects
Roger McGuinn – backing vocal on “All The Wrong Reasons”
Richard Tandy – synthesizer on “Two Gunslingers”

Producer’s Note: Tom Petty Hi-Res Remastering :: The Hi-Res (24bit 96K) remastering of the Tom Petty catalog reveals a level of detail that was only previously heard by a select group of musicians, producers and engineers in the studio. It’s as close to the sound of original stereo master as you can get. We’re very happy with the way it came out, and believe it’s an important way to preserve the legacy of this great body of work.
If hearing the highest possible sound quality is important to you, then this is where you’ll get it.
The remastering was done in the fall of 2014 by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering. I supervised it and Tom approved it. Great care was taken to find the original first-generation masters and transfer them with minimal eq and little or no dynamic range compression. In cases where the first-generation masters were unusable, we used the best sounding second-generation masters.*
To allow for full dynamic range, and to let the music “breathe” the Hi-Res versions have about 6-8db less digital level than a typical “loud” peak-limited CD or mp3. To enjoy these albums to their fullest extent, play them back though a good system and turn up the volume.
With this increased level of detail and sonic impact, we hope you’ll enjoy rediscovering these great albums as much as we did! —Ryan Ulyate, April 2014

Continue reading »

Jul 24

Tom Petty – Full Moon Fever (1989/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96kHz | Time – 39:55 minutes | 956 MB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | © Geffen Records
Recorded: 1988–89 at M.C. Studios, Rumbo Studios, Sunset Sound, Devonshire Studios, Conway Studios and Sound City Studios

Exclusively on HDtracks, images of the master tapes are included with every download, along with a note from the remaster producer, Ryan Ulyate.

This was the first Tom Petty ‘solo’ album although most of the Heartbreakers played on the record. Jeff Lynne produced along with Tom Petty and Mike Campbell and recording was done at M.C. Studios in Los Angeles, CA. Full Moon Fever featured five singles: “I Won’€™t Back Down”, “Runnin’€™ Down A Dream”, “Free Fallin’”, “A Face In The Crowd”, and “Yer So Bad”.

Full Moon Fever is the first solo album by Tom Petty, though it features contributions from members of his backing band the Heartbreakers, notably Mike Campbell, along with Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison, and George Harrison of the Traveling Wilburys. The record shows Petty exploring his musical roots with nods to his influences. The songwriting is mainly collaborations between Petty and Lynne, who was also a producer on the album. The album became a commercial and critical success peaking at number 3 on the Billboard 200 and being certified 5× platinum in the United States and 6× platinum in Canada.

Although Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough) found the Heartbreakers regaining their strength as a band and discovering a newfound ease at songcraft, it just didn’t sell that well. Perhaps that factor, along with road fatigue, led Tom Petty to record his first solo album, Full Moon Fever. Nevertheless, the distinction between “solo” and “Heartbreakers” is a fuzzy one because Full Moon Fever is essentially in the same style as the Heartbreakers albums; Mike Campbell co-wrote two songs and co-produced the record, and he, along with Benmont Tench and Howie Epstein, all play on the album. However, the album sounds different from any Heartbreakers record due to the presence of former Electric Light Orchestra leader Jeff Lynne. Petty co-wrote the lion’s share of the album with Lynne, who also is the record’s main producer. In his hands, Petty’s roots rock becomes clean and glossy, layered with shimmering vocal harmonies, keyboards, and acoustic guitars. It’s a friendly, radio-ready sound, and if it has dated somewhat over the years, the craft is still admirable and appealing. But the real reason Full Moon Fever became Petty’s biggest hit is that it boasted a selection of songs that rivaled Damn the Torpedoes. Full Moon Fever didn’t have a weak track; even if a few weren’t quite as strong as others, the album was filled with highlights: “I Won’t Back Down,” the wistful “A Face in the Crowd,” the rockabilly throwaways “Yer So Bad” and “A Mind with a Heart of Its Own,” the Byrds cover “Feel a Whole Lot Better,” the charging “Runnin’ Down a Dream,” and “Free Fallin’,” a coming-of-age ballad that could be Petty’s best song. Full Moon Fever might have been meant as an off-the-cuff detour, but it turned into a minor masterpiece. –Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 Free Fallin’ 04:16
2 I Won’t Back Down 02:57
3 Love Is A Long Road 04:07
4 A Face In The Crowd 03:59
5 Runnin’ Down A Dream 04:53
6 Feel A Whole Lot Better 02:49
7 Yer So Bad 03:06
8 Depending On You 02:48
9 The Apartment Song 02:33
10 Alright For Now 02:01
11 A Mind With A Heart Of It’s Own 03:29
12 Zombie Zoo 02:57

Personnel:
Tom Petty – guitars, vocals, keyboards, noise, handclapping, tambourine, backing vocals
Mike Campbell – bass, guitar, keyboards, mandolin, slide guitar
George Harrison – guitar, backing vocals
Jeff Lynne – bass, guitar, handclapping, keyboards, backing vocals
Benmont Tench – piano
Del Shannon – noise, sound effects
Roy Orbison, Howie Epstein, Trembling Blenders – backing vocals
Phil Jones – drums, percussion
Jim Keltner – drums, maracas, marimba, tambourine
Kelsey Campbell – screams, sound effects, voices

Producer’s Note: Tom Petty Hi-Res Remastering :: The Hi-Res (24bit 96K) remastering of the Tom Petty catalog reveals a level of detail that was only previously heard by a select group of musicians, producers and engineers in the studio. It’s as close to the sound of original stereo master as you can get. We’re very happy with the way it came out, and believe it’s an important way to preserve the legacy of this great body of work.
If hearing the highest possible sound quality is important to you, then this is where you’ll get it.
The remastering was done in the fall of 2014 by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering. I supervised it and Tom approved it. Great care was taken to find the original first-generation masters and transfer them with minimal eq and little or no dynamic range compression. In cases where the first-generation masters were unusable, we used the best sounding second-generation masters.*
To allow for full dynamic range, and to let the music “breathe” the Hi-Res versions have about 6-8db less digital level than a typical “loud” peak-limited CD or mp3. To enjoy these albums to their fullest extent, play them back though a good system and turn up the volume.
With this increased level of detail and sonic impact, we hope you’ll enjoy rediscovering these great albums as much as we did! —Ryan Ulyate, April 2014

Continue reading »

Jul 24

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough) (1987/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz  | Time – 00:40:52 minutes | 911 MB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: Qobuz | © Geffen Records
Recorded: 1986–87 at Sound City and M.C. Studios, LA

Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough) (styled on the cover as “Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough)” with quotation marks) is the seventh studio album by the American band Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, released in 1987. This album features more songwriting collaborations between Petty and Mike Campbell than any other Petty album. It is also notable for being the only previous studio album not represented on Petty’s 1993 Greatest Hits album, even though the single “Jammin’ Me” (co-written with fellow Traveling Wilbury Bob Dylan) was #1 on the Mainstream Rock Tracks for four weeks. “Jammin’ Me” was later included in the album Anthology: Through the Years, which the RIAA has declared gold. In addition, Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough) was made to sound like a live recording, using a technique they borrowed from Dylan.

Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers spent much of 1986 on the road as Bob Dylan’s backing band. Dylan’s presence proved to be a huge influence on the Heartbreakers, turning them away from the well-intentioned but slick pretensions of Southern Accents and toward a loose, charmingly ramshackle roots rock that harked back to their roots yet exhibited the professional eclecticism they developed during the mid-’80s. All of this was on full display on Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough), their simplest and best album since Hard Promises. Not to say that Let Me Up is a perfect album — far from it, actually. Filled with loose ends, song fragments, and unvarnished productions, it’s a defiantly messy album, and it’s all the better for it, especially arriving on the heels of the well-groomed Accents. Apart from the (slightly dated) rant “Jammin’ Me’” (co-written by Dylan, but you can’t tell), there aren’t any standouts on the record, but there’s no filler either — it’s just simply a good collection of ballads (“Runaway Trains”), country-rockers (“The Damage You’ve Done”), pop/rock (“All Mixed Up,” “Think About Me”), and hard rockers (“Let Me Up [I’ve Had Enough]”). While that might not be enough to qualify Let Me Up as one of Petty & the Heartbreakers’ masterpieces, it is enough to qualify it as the most underrated record in their catalog. –Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 Jammin’ Me 4:08
2 Runaway Trains 5:12
3 The Damage You’ve Done 3:52
4 It’ll All Work Out 3:12
5 My Life / Your World 4:38
6 Think About Me 3:42
7 All Mixed Up 3:42
8 A Self-Made Man 3:04
9 Ain’t Love Strange 2:40
10 How Many More Days 3:16
11 Let Me Up (I’ve Had Enough) 3:30

Personnel:
Tom Petty – lead and background vocals, 6 and 12 string electric and acoustic guitars, bass guitar
Mike Campbell – lead guitar, 12-string guitar, acoustic guitar, bass guitar, Dobro, keyboards, dulcimer, mandolin, ukulele, slide guitar, percussion
Howie Epstein – bass guitar, harmony vocals
Benmont Tench – acoustic and electric pianos, Hammond and Vox organs, vibraphone, synthesizer
Stan Lynch – drums, percussion

Continue reading »

Jul 24

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Southern Accents (1985/2015) 
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96kHz | Time – 39:36 minutes | 865 MB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | © Geffen Records
Recorded: 1983–85 at Gone Gator One; Sound City; Village Recorder; Sunset Sound, LA and Church Studio, London

Exclusively on HDtracks, images of the master tapes are included with every download, along with a note from the remaster producer, Ryan Ulyate.

This album is the Heartbreakers’€™ sixth and featured multiple producers on various tracks including Tom Petty, Mike Campbell, Jimmy Iovine, Dave Stewart, and Robbie Robertson. It was recorded at Gone Gator One Studios, Sound City, Village Recorder, Sunset Sound, and Church Studio, London. Southern Accents made it to number 7 on the US Billboard 200 after its release in 1985. Singles from this album include “Make It Better (Forget About Me)”, “Rebels” and “Don’€™t Come Around Here No More”, which peaked at number 13 on Billboard‘s Hot 100.

Produced by Dave Stewart, Southern Accents is an ambitious album, attempting to incorporate touches of psychedelia, soul, and country into a loose concept about the modern South. Occasionally, the songs work; “Rebels” and “Spike” are fine rockers, and “Don’t Come Around Here No More” and “Make It Better (Forget About Me)” expand The Heartbreakers’ sound nicely. But too often, the record is weighed down by its own ambitions. –Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 Rebels 05:19
2 It Ain’t Nothin’ To Me 05:10
3 Don’t Come Around Here No More 05:04
4 Southern Accents 04:44
5 Make It Better (Forget About Me) 04:22
6 Spike 03:32
7 Dogs On The Run 03:39
8 Mary’s New Car 03:44
9 The Best Of Everything 04:02

Personnel:
Tom Petty – vocals, guitars, piano, keyboards, percussion, producer, bass guitar
Mike Campbell – guitar, bass guitar, Dobro, keyboards, vocals, producer, slide guitar
Benmont Tench – piano, keyboards, piano (electric), vocals, vibraphone
Stan Lynch – drums, percussion, keyboards, vocals
Howie Epstein – bass guitar, vocals, harmony vocals

Producer’s Note: Tom Petty Hi-Res Remastering :: The Hi-Res (24bit 96K) remastering of the Tom Petty catalog reveals a level of detail that was only previously heard by a select group of musicians, producers and engineers in the studio. It’s as close to the sound of original stereo master as you can get. We’re very happy with the way it came out, and believe it’s an important way to preserve the legacy of this great body of work.
If hearing the highest possible sound quality is important to you, then this is where you’ll get it.
The remastering was done in the fall of 2014 by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering. I supervised it and Tom approved it. Great care was taken to find the original first-generation masters and transfer them with minimal eq and little or no dynamic range compression. In cases where the first-generation masters were unusable, we used the best sounding second-generation masters.*
To allow for full dynamic range, and to let the music “breathe” the Hi-Res versions have about 6-8db less digital level than a typical “loud” peak-limited CD or mp3. To enjoy these albums to their fullest extent, play them back though a good system and turn up the volume.
With this increased level of detail and sonic impact, we hope you’ll enjoy rediscovering these great albums as much as we did! —Ryan Ulyate, April 2014

Continue reading »

Jul 24

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Pack Up The Plantation: Live! (1985/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96kHz | Time – 01:12:06 minutes | 1,54 GB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | © Geffen Records

Recorded live at the Wiltern Theatre, Los Angeles, California, August 7, 1985 except, “Don’t Bring Me Down” – Paradise Theater, Boston, Massachusetts, July 16, 1978; “Stories We Could Tell” – Hammersmith Odeon, London, England, March 7, 1980, engineered by Charles Kaplan in the Mobile Manor Unit; “Needles and Pins” & “Insider” – The Forum, Los Angeles, California, June 1981; “Shout” – The Coliseum, Richfield, Ohio, March 19, 1983; “Rockin’ Around (With You)” – Irvine Meadows Amphitheater, Irvine, California, June 1983

Exclusively on HDtracks, images of the master tapes are included with every download, along with a note from the remaster producer, Ryan Ulyate.

Until The Live Anthology was released in 2009, this was the only live album the Heartbreakers ever released. Primarily recorded at a show at the Wiltern Theatre in Los Angeles, CA on August 7, 1985, the album also includes the following tracks recorded at other concerts. Pack Up The Plantation: Live! includes single “Needles and Pins” featuring Stevie Nicks.

Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers released a live video as a companion piece to their 1985 concert album Pack Up the Plantation: Live!. Taken from one show at Los Angeles’ Wiltern Theater, the video is in some ways superior to the record, since its single source provides a continuity missing on the LP, but the real distinction are the songs that aren’t featured on the record. “Little Bit o’ Soul,” “Make It Better (Forget About Me),” “Route 66,” “You Got Lucky,” “Don’t Do Me Like That,” “I Need to Know,” “Don’t Come Around Here No More,” and “Spike” are all on the video, not on the CD, which makes it necessary for collectors, especially since all the performances are quite good. Nevertheless, Pack Up the Plantation suffers from the same problem as its vinyl companion — it isn’t quite the stunning performance that the Heartbreakers are capable of delivering — but it’s still thoroughly entertaining. –Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 So You Want To Be A Rock & Roll Star 3:30
2 Needles And Pins 2:23
3 The Waiting 5:08
4 Breakdown 7:43
5 American Girl 3:50
6 It Ain’t Nothin’ To Me 6:05
7 Insider 5:16
8 Rockin’ Around (With You) 3:20
9 Refugee 5:22
10 Southern Accents 5:20
11 Rebels 6:10
12 Don’t Bring Me Down 3:40
13 Shout 9:30
14 Stories We Could Tell 3:55

Personnel:
Tom Petty – 6 & 12-string electric & acoustic guitars, lead vocals
Mike Campbell – lead guitar, 12-string, lap steel & slide guitars
Howie Epstein – bass, mandolin & harmony vocals
Benmont Tench – keyboards & vocals
Stan Lynch – drums & vocals
Soul Lips Horns: (on tracks recorded at the Wiltern Theater)
Jimmy Zavala – saxes, harmonica
Lee Thornburg – trumpets, flugel horn
Nick Lane – trombones, euphonium
The Rebeletts: (on tracks recorded at the Wiltern Theater)
Pat Peterson – backing vocals, percussion
Caroll Sue Hill – backing vocals, percussion
Musicians:
Ron Blair – bass on “Insider”, “Needles and Pins”, “Stories We Could Tell” & “Don’t Bring Me Down”
Phil Jones – percussion on “Insider”, “Needles and Pins”, “Rockin’ Around (With You)” & “Shout”
Bobby Valentino – violin on “Stories We Could Tell”
Stevie Nicks – vocals on “Insider” & “Needles and Pins”

Producer’s Note: Tom Petty Hi-Res Remastering :: The Hi-Res (24bit 96K) remastering of the Tom Petty catalog reveals a level of detail that was only previously heard by a select group of musicians, producers and engineers in the studio. It’s as close to the sound of original stereo master as you can get. We’re very happy with the way it came out, and believe it’s an important way to preserve the legacy of this great body of work.
If hearing the highest possible sound quality is important to you, then this is where you’ll get it.
The remastering was done in the fall of 2014 by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering. I supervised it and Tom approved it. Great care was taken to find the original first-generation masters and transfer them with minimal eq and little or no dynamic range compression. In cases where the first-generation masters were unusable, we used the best sounding second-generation masters.*
To allow for full dynamic range, and to let the music “breathe” the Hi-Res versions have about 6-8db less digital level than a typical “loud” peak-limited CD or mp3. To enjoy these albums to their fullest extent, play them back though a good system and turn up the volume.
With this increased level of detail and sonic impact, we hope you’ll enjoy rediscovering these great albums as much as we did! —Ryan Ulyate, April 2014

Continue reading »

Jul 24

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Long After Dark (1982/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96kHz | Time – 37:45 minutes | 824 MB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | © Geffen Records
Recorded: 1981–82 at Record Plant, Wally Heider’s and Crystal, Hollywood, CA; Rumbo Studios, Canoga Park, CA

Exclusively on HDtracks, images of the master tapes are included with every download, along with a note from the remaster producer, Ryan Ulyate.

The Heartbreakers’ fifth album was also the first to feature Howie Epstein on bass. This album was produced by Tom Petty and Jimmy Iovine and was recorded at four different studios: Record Plant in Hollywood, CA, Wally Heider’s in Hollywood, CA, Crystal in Hollywood, CA and Rumbo Studios in Canoga Park, CA. “You Got Lucky” and “Change of Heart” were released as singles.

Long After Dark is the fifth album by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, released in November 1982 on Backstreet Records. Notable for the major MTV hit “You Got Lucky”, the album was also the first to feature the late Howie Epstein on bass and harmony vocals. Epstein’s vocals are evident throughout the album, most notably on “Change of Heart”. From this point on Epstein’s vocals became an integral part of the Heartbreakers’ sound. In addition, it was the first Heartbreakers album to feature a real synthesizer on record.
There was a song recorded for this album called “Keeping Me Alive”, which Petty himself is very fond of but the producer, Jimmy Iovine, disliked. Petty has expressed that he feels the album would have turned out better if the song had been included on the album. “Keeping Me Alive” was eventually released on Petty’s 1995 box set compilation Playback.

Riding high on the back-to-back Top Five, platinum hits Damn the Torpedoes and Hard Promises, Tom Petty quickly returned to the studio to record the Heartbreakers’ fifth album, Long After Dark. Truth be told, there was about as long a gap between Dark and Promises as there was between Promises and Torpedoes, but there was a difference this time around — Petty & the Heartbreakers sounded tired. Even if there are a few new wave flourishes here and there, the band hasn’t really changed its style at all — it’s still Stonesy, Byrdsian heartland rock. As their first four albums illustrated, that isn’t a problem in itself, since they’ve found numerous variations within their signature sound, providing they have the right songs. Unfortunately, Petty had a dry spell on Long After Dark. With its swirling, minor key guitars, “You Got Lucky” is a classic and “Change of Heart” comes close to matching those peaks, but the remaining songs rarely rise above agreeable filler. Since the Heartbreakers are a very good band, it means the record sounds pretty good as it’s playing, but apart from those few highlights, nothing much is memorable once the album has finished. And coming on the heels of two excellent records, that’s quite a disappointment. –Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 A One Story Town 03:06
2 You Got Lucky 03:36
3 Deliver Me 03:28
4 Change Of Heart 03:18
5 Finding Out 03:36
6 We Stand A Chance 03:38
7 Straight Into Darkness 03:48
8 The Same Old You 03:30
9 Between Two Worlds 05:11
10 A Wasted Life 04:34

Personnel:
Tom Petty – lead vocals, 6 and 12 string acoustic and electric guitars, lead guitar on “We Stand a Chance”, Prophet 5 synthesizer
Mike Campbell – lead guitar, 12-string guitar, organ on “We Stand a Chance”
Benmont Tench – acoustic and electric pianos, Hammond and Vox organs, synthesizer, backing vocals
Stan Lynch – drums, backing vocals
Howie Epstein – bass guitar, backing vocals
Phil Jones – percussion
Ron Blair – bass guitar on “Between Two Worlds”

Producer’s Note: Tom Petty Hi-Res Remastering :: The Hi-Res (24bit 96K) remastering of the Tom Petty catalog reveals a level of detail that was only previously heard by a select group of musicians, producers and engineers in the studio. It’s as close to the sound of original stereo master as you can get. We’re very happy with the way it came out, and believe it’s an important way to preserve the legacy of this great body of work.
If hearing the highest possible sound quality is important to you, then this is where you’ll get it.
The remastering was done in the fall of 2014 by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering. I supervised it and Tom approved it. Great care was taken to find the original first-generation masters and transfer them with minimal eq and little or no dynamic range compression. In cases where the first-generation masters were unusable, we used the best sounding second-generation masters.*
To allow for full dynamic range, and to let the music “breathe” the Hi-Res versions have about 6-8db less digital level than a typical “loud” peak-limited CD or mp3. To enjoy these albums to their fullest extent, play them back though a good system and turn up the volume.
With this increased level of detail and sonic impact, we hope you’ll enjoy rediscovering these great albums as much as we did! —Ryan Ulyate, April 2014

Continue reading »

Jul 24

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Hard Promises (1981/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96kHz | Time – 40:02 minutes | 861 MB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | © Geffen Records
Recorded: 1980–81 at Sound City, Van Nuys, Cherokee Studios, Hollywood, CA and Goodnight, LA

Exclusively on HDtracks, images of the master tapes are included with every download, along with a note from the remaster producer, Ryan Ulyate.

Hard Promises is the fourth album by the Heartbreakers was produced by Jimmy Iovine and Tom Petty and was recorded at Sound City in Van Nuys, CA and Cherokee Studios in Hollywood, CA. Both “The Waiting” and “A Woman In Love (It’s Not Me)” were released as singles.

Damn the Torpedoes wasn’t simply a culmination of Tom Petty’s art; it happened to be a huge success, enabling him to call the shots on its successor, Hard Promises. Infamously, he used his first album as a star to challenge the record industry’s practice of charging more for A-list artists, demanding that Hard Promises should be listed for less than most records by an artist of his stature, but if that was the only thing notable about the album, it would have disappeared like Long After Dark. Instead, it offered a reaffirmation that Damn the Torpedoes wasn’t a fluke. There’s not much new on the surface, since it continues the sound of its predecessor, but it’s filled with great songwriting, something that’s as difficult to achieve as a distinctive sound. The opener, “The Waiting,” became the best-known song on the record, but there’s no discounting “A Woman in Love (It’s Not Me),” “Nightwatchman,” “Kings Road,” “Insider,” and “The Criminal Kind,” album tracks that would become fan favorites. If Hard Promises doesn’t have the sweep of Damn the Torpedoes, that’s because its predecessor was blessed with good timing and an unusually strong set of songs. Hard Promises isn’t quite so epochal, yet it has a tremendous set of songs and a unified sound that makes it one of Petty’s finest records. —Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 The Waiting 03:58
2 A Woman In Love (It’s Not Me) 04:22
3 Nightwatchman 04:01
4 Something Big 04:44
5 Kings Road 03:24
6 Letting You Go 03:23
7 A Thing About You 03:31
8 Insider 04:23
9 The Criminal Kind 03:59
10 You Can Still Change Your Mind 04:17

Personnel:
Tom Petty – lead vocals, 12 & 6 string electric and acoustic guitars, bass guitar, electric piano
Mike Campbell – 12 & 6 string guitar, electric guitars, auto-harp, accordion, harmonium, bass guitar
Benmont Tench – organ, piano, backing vocals
Ron Blair – bass guitar
Stan Lynch – drums, backing vocals
Additional:
Phil Jones – percussion
Stevie Nicks – backing vocals
Donald “Duck” Dunn – bass guitar
Sharon Celani – backing vocals
Alan “Bugs” Weidel – piano

Producer’s Note: Tom Petty Hi-Res Remastering :: The Hi-Res (24bit 96K) remastering of the Tom Petty catalog reveals a level of detail that was only previously heard by a select group of musicians, producers and engineers in the studio. It’s as close to the sound of original stereo master as you can get. We’re very happy with the way it came out, and believe it’s an important way to preserve the legacy of this great body of work.
If hearing the highest possible sound quality is important to you, then this is where you’ll get it.
The remastering was done in the fall of 2014 by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering. I supervised it and Tom approved it. Great care was taken to find the original first-generation masters and transfer them with minimal eq and little or no dynamic range compression. In cases where the first-generation masters were unusable, we used the best sounding second-generation masters.*
To allow for full dynamic range, and to let the music “breathe” the Hi-Res versions have about 6-8db less digital level than a typical “loud” peak-limited CD or mp3. To enjoy these albums to their fullest extent, play them back though a good system and turn up the volume.
With this increased level of detail and sonic impact, we hope you’ll enjoy rediscovering these great albums as much as we did! —Ryan Ulyate, April 2014

Continue reading »

Jul 24

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Damn The Torpedoes (1979) {2010 Deluxe Edition}
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 66:34 minutes | 1,48 GB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks.com | Digital Booklet

One of the most highly acclaimed albums of the 1970s, Damn the Torpedoes remains a steadfast on plenty of “all time greatest” lists. Rolling Stone ranked it in their “500 greatest albums of all time” and MOJO placed it in their “70 from the 1970’s” list. Widely regarded as the band’s magnum opus, the album spent 7 weeks on Billboard’s chart and yielded two massive singles: “Don’t Do Me Like That” and “Refuge.” At last, the album is given a much-deserved full reissue treatment, including 96kHz/24bit remastering and a bonus disc including previously unreleased studio material (including the gem “Nowhere”), two B-sides, demos, and three searing live tracks from a 1980 performance at London’s Hammersmith Odeon. Even if you know every one of these iconic masterpieces by heart, to hear this stunning remaster/reissue is to experience one of rock & roll’s all-time greatest albums for the first time.

Tracklist:
CD1/2 #01/09 – Refugee
CD1/2 #02/09 – Here Comes My Girl
CD1/2 #03/09 – Even The Losers
CD1/2 #04/09 – Shadow Of A Doubt (A Complex Kid)
CD1/2 #05/09 – Century City
CD1/2 #06/09 – Don’t Do Me Like That
CD1/2 #07/09 – You Tell Me
CD1/2 #08/09 – What Are You Doin’ In My Life?
CD1/2 #09/09 – Louisiana Rain

CD2/2 #01/09 – Nowhere
CD2/2 #02/09 – Surrender
CD2/2 #03/09 – Casa Dega (Single Version)
CD2/2 #04/09 – It’s Rainin’ Again (Playback 1995 Box Set Version)
CD2/2 #05/09 – Shadow Of A Doubt (A Complex Kid) (Live)
CD2/2 #06/09 – Don’t Do Me Like That (Live)
CD2/2 #07/09 – Somethin’ Else (Live)
CD2/2 #08/09 – Casa Dega (Demo)
CD2/2 #09/09 – Refugee (Alternate Take)

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Jul 24

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – You’re Gonna Get It! (1978/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz  | Time – 00:29:13 minutes | 645 MB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: Qobuz | © Warner Bros. Records
Recorded: Shelter Studio, Hollywood 1977–78

You’re Gonna Get It! is the second album by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, released in 1978. Originally, the album was to be titled Terminal Romance. Like its self-titled predecessor, this album includes tight melodic songs awash in ringing guitars and organ. It reached #23 on Billboard’s Top LP’s & Tapes chart in 1978. It also earned Petty and the Heartbreakers their first gold record.

Many reviewers rated You’re Gonna Get It! only a notch lower than their moderately well-received debut album. Some reviews such as in Rolling Stone at the time noted the “impressive stylistic cohesiveness” between the two. It did chart higher, however, than its predecessor.

Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers didn’t really knock out their second album — it was released two years after their debut — but it sure sounds as if they did. There are some wonderful moments on this record, but it often feels like leftovers from a strong debut, or an album written on the road, especially since the music is simply an extension of the first album. That said, when You’re Gonna Get It! works, it devastates. That’s not saying that “When the Time Comes” is a masterpiece, even if it’s a fine opener, but it does mean that “I Need to Know” and the scathing “Listen to Her Heart” are testaments to how good this band could be when it was focused. If the rest of the album doesn’t achieve this level of perfection, that’s a signal that they were still finding their footing, but overall it’s still a solid record, filled with good performances that are never quite as good as the songs. It’s pretty good as it spins, but once it finishes, you remember those two songs at the heart of the record, maybe the opener and closer, which are stronger than the rest of the competent, enjoyable, yet unremarkable roots-rockers that surround them. Not necessarily a transitional effort — after all, it pretty much mirrors its predecessor — but a holding pattern that may not suggest the peaks of what’s to come, but still delivers a good soundalike of the debut. –Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 When The Time Comes 2:48
2 You’re Gonna Get It 3:00
3 Hurt 3:19
4 Magnolia 3:01
5 Too Much Ain’t Enough 2:56
6 I Need To Know 2:26
7 Listen To Her Heart 3:04
8 No Second Thoughts 2:41
9 Restless 3:22
10 Baby’s A Rock ‘N’ Roller 2:53

Personnel:
Tom Petty – electric guitar, acoustic guitar, twelve string guitar, rhythm guitar, piano, vocals
Mike Campbell – electric guitar, acoustic guitar, twelve string guitar, lead guitar, accordion
Benmont Tench – piano, hammond organ, keyboards, backing vocals
Ron Blair – bass guitar, acoustic guitar, sound effects, backing vocals
Stan Lynch – drums
Additional:
Noah Shark – percussion
Phil Seymour – backing vocals on “Magnolia”

Producer’s Note: Tom Petty Hi-Res Remastering :: The Hi-Res (24bit 96K) remastering of the Tom Petty catalog reveals a level of detail that was only previously heard by a select group of musicians, producers and engineers in the studio. It’s as close to the sound of original stereo master as you can get. We’re very happy with the way it came out, and believe it’s an important way to preserve the legacy of this great body of work.
If hearing the highest possible sound quality is important to you, then this is where you’ll get it.
The remastering was done in the fall of 2014 by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering. I supervised it and Tom approved it. Great care was taken to find the original first-generation masters and transfer them with minimal eq and little or no dynamic range compression. In cases where the first-generation masters were unusable, we used the best sounding second-generation masters.*
To allow for full dynamic range, and to let the music “breathe” the Hi-Res versions have about 6-8db less digital level than a typical “loud” peak-limited CD or mp3. To enjoy these albums to their fullest extent, play them back though a good system and turn up the volume.
With this increased level of detail and sonic impact, we hope you’ll enjoy rediscovering these great albums as much as we did! —Ryan Ulyate, April 2014

Continue reading »

Jul 24

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers (1976/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz  | Time – 00:30:31 minutes | 627 MB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: Qobuz | © Warner Bros. Records
Recorded: 1974–76 at Shelter Studio, Hollywood, CA

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers is the eponymous debut album by the band of the same name, released on November 9, 1976 by Shelter Records.

Initially following its release, the album received little attention in the United States. Following a British tour, it climbed to #24 on the UK album chart and the single “Anything That’s Rock ‘n’ Roll” became a hit in the UK. After nearly a year and many positive reviews, the album reached the U.S. charts, where it climbed to #55 in 1978 and eventually went Gold. The single “Breakdown” cracked the Top 40 in the U.S. and “American Girl” became an FM radio staple that can still be heard today.

At the time Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers’ debut was released in 1976, they were fresh enough to almost be considered punk. They weren’t as reckless or visionary as the Ramones, but they shared a similar love for pure ’60s rock and, for the Heartbreakers, that meant embracing the Byrds as much as the Stones. And that’s pretty much what this album is — tuneful jangle balanced by a tough garage swagger. At times, the attitude and the sound override the songwriting, but that’s alright, since the slight songs (“Anything That’s Rock ‘N’ Roll,” to pick a random example) are still infused with spirit and an appealing surface. Petty & the Heartbreakers feel underground on this album, at least to the extent that power pop was underground in 1976; with Dwight Twilley providing backing vocals for “Strangered in the Night,” the similarities between the two bands (adherence to pop hooks and melodies, love of guitars) become apparent. Petty wound up eclipsing Twilley because he rocked harder, something that’s evident throughout this record. Take the closer “American Girl” — it’s a Byrds song by any other name, but he pushed the Heartbreakers to treat it as a rock & roll song, not as something delicate. There are times where the album starts to drift, especially on the second side, but the highlights — “Rockin’ Around (With You),” “Hometown Blues,” “The Wild One, Forever,” the AOR staples “Breakdown” and “American Girl” — still illustrate how refreshing Petty & the Heartbreakers sounded in 1976. –Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 Rockin’ Around (With You) 2:29
2 Breakdown 2:44
3 Hometown Blues 2:14
4 The Wild One, Forever 3:02
5 Anything That’s Rock ‘N’ Roll 2:24
6 Strangered In The Night 3:33
7 Fooled Again (I Don’t Like It) 3:49
8 Mystery Man 3:03
9 Luna 3:58
10 American Girl 3:32

Personnel:
Tom Petty – vocals, electric guitar, acoustic guitar, keyboards
Mike Campbell – electric guitar, acoustic guitar
Benmont Tench – piano, hammond organ, keyboards
Ron Blair – bass guitar on tracks 1-2, 4-5, 7-10, cello
Stan Lynch – drums on tracks 1-2, 4-10, keyboards
Additional:
Jeff Jourard – electric guitar on tracks 2, 7
Donald “Duck” Dunn – bass guitar on track 3
Emory Gordy – bass guitar on track 6
Randall Marsh – drums on track 3
Jim Gordon – drums on track 6
Noah Shark – maracas, tambourine, sleigh bells
Charlie Souza – saxophone on track 3
Phil Seymour – backing vocals
Dwight Twilley – backing vocals

Producer’s Note: Tom Petty Hi-Res Remastering :: The Hi-Res (24bit 96K) remastering of the Tom Petty catalog reveals a level of detail that was only previously heard by a select group of musicians, producers and engineers in the studio. It’s as close to the sound of original stereo master as you can get. We’re very happy with the way it came out, and believe it’s an important way to preserve the legacy of this great body of work.
If hearing the highest possible sound quality is important to you, then this is where you’ll get it.
The remastering was done in the fall of 2014 by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering. I supervised it and Tom approved it. Great care was taken to find the original first-generation masters and transfer them with minimal eq and little or no dynamic range compression. In cases where the first-generation masters were unusable, we used the best sounding second-generation masters.*
To allow for full dynamic range, and to let the music “breathe” the Hi-Res versions have about 6-8db less digital level than a typical “loud” peak-limited CD or mp3. To enjoy these albums to their fullest extent, play them back though a good system and turn up the volume.
With this increased level of detail and sonic impact, we hope you’ll enjoy rediscovering these great albums as much as we did! —Ryan Ulyate, April 2014

Continue reading »

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