Jul 25

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Hypnotic Eye (2014) [Bonus Track Edition]
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/48 kHz | Time – 48:53 minutes | 601 MB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: TomPetty.com | Front cover

Hypnotic Eye is the first album from the band in four years. “I knew I wanted to do a rock & roll record”, – Petty told Rolling Stone in April. “We hadn’t made a straight hard-rockin’ record, from beginning to end, in a long time”. This special Hi-Res edition expanded with one extra track “Playing Dumb” recorded during the album sessions.

Looking back, it’s clear the 2008 Mudcrutch reunion was pivotal for Tom Petty, helping him re-focus and re-dedicate himself to playing in a band. Like the original band, Mudcrutch Mach II didn’t last long — long enough to play a few shows and record a warm, gangly beast of an album — but it reinvigorated Petty. Afterward, he reveled in the sound of how the Heartbreakers played, digging deep into his catalog to shake up his set lists, letting the group exercise some blues muscles on 2010’s Mojo, a record that stood as the Heartbreakers’ rowdiest record since the ’70s but which is easily overshadowed by the trashy psychedelic pulse of 2014’s Hypnotic Eye. Teeming with fuzz, overdriven organ, and hard four-four rhythms, all interrupted by the occasional blues workout or jazz shuffle, Hypnotic Eye comes across as a knowing splice of Petty’s own XM radio show Buried Treasures and Little Steven Van Zandt’s Sirius channel Underground Garage, a record that celebrates all the disreputable 45s created in garages so they could be played in garages. Occasionally, the band evoke memories of their own past — “Shadow People” has guitar tones straight out of Shelter Records — but they’re largely dedicated to the sounds that provided them with their original inspirations. What prevents Hypnotic Eye from sliding into the arena of soft, desperate nostalgia is a combination of muscle and savvy, a combination that gives the album a strong infrastructure — Petty strips his songs to the bone; they’re so lean they feel as if they clock in at two minutes, even if they run twice that long — and a sonic wallop. Much of that visceral thrill is due to co-producers Petty, guitarist Mike Campbell, and Ryan Ulyate accentuating the intuitive interplay in the Heartbreakers with sharp, striking slashes of color; this gives the record immediacy and complexity, which means there is enough aural activity that repeated plays do not dull the LP’s initial bracing impact. Ultimately, Hypnotic Eye is a record about the pure joy of sound, a rush that doesn’t lessen upon repetition — a sentiment that’s true of those old ’60s garage rock singles and early Heartbreakers albums, and this is a surprisingly, satisfyingly vigorous record.

Tracklist:
01 – American Dream Plan B
02 – Fault Lines
03 – Red River
04 – Full Grown Boy
05 – All You Can Carry
06 – Power Drunk
07 – Forgotten Man
08 – Sins Of My Youth
09 – U Get Me High
10 – Burnt Out Town
11 – Shadow People
12 – Playing Dumb [Extra Track]

Musicians:
Tom Petty – vocals, rhythm guitar, production
Mike Campbell – lead guitar, production
Scott Thurston – rhythm guitar, harmonica
Benmont Tench – acoustic and electric piano, organ
Ron Blair – bass guitar
Steve Ferrone – drums, percussion

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Jul 25

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Mojo Tour 2010 (2011)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/48 kHz | Time – 72:37 minutes | 1,02 GB | Genre: Rock
Official WEB Edition 24bit/48kHz – Source: TomPetty.com | Artwork

An exclusive collection of random live tracks recorded buring the Mojo Tour 2010. Available for (that) tour ticket purchasers and members of the Highway Companions Club. Digital download only.

Tracklist:
01 – Listen To Her Heart
02 – King’s Highway
03 – You Don’t Know How It Feels
04 – I Won’t Back Down
05 – Drivin’ Down To Georgia
06 – Breakdown
07 – Jefferson Jericho Blues
08 – First Flash Of Freedom
09 – Running Man’s Bible
10 – I Should Have Known It
11 – Good Enough
12 – Refugee
13 – Runnin’ Down A Dream
14 – American Girl

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Jul 25

Tom Petty – Highway Companion (2006/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96kHz | Time – 43:42 minutes | 895 MB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | © Warner Bros. Records
Recorded: 2005-2006 at Bungalow Palace and Shoreline Recorders in Los Angeles, CA.

Exclusively on HDtracks, images of the master tapes are included with every download, along with a note from the remaster producer, Ryan Ulyate.

Highway Companion, Tom Petty’s third solo album, was recorded at Bungalow Palace and Shoreline Recorders in Los Angeles, CA. Jeff Lynne produced the album with Tom Petty and Mike Campbell. Both “Saving Grace” and “Big Weekend” were released to radio as singles. The record peaked at number 4 on the Billboard 200 chart and hit number one on the US Rock Albums chart in 2006.

Tom Petty’s concept for his third solo album is laid bare in its very title: it’s called Highway Companion, which is a tip-off that this record was made with the road in mind. As it kicks off with the chugging Jimmy Reed-via-ZZ Top riff on “Saving Grace,” the album does indeed seem to be ideal music for road trips, but Petty changes gears pretty quickly, down-shifting to the bittersweet acoustic “Square One.” Although the album ramps back up with the ’60s-styled pop of “Flirting with Time” and the swampy, Dylan-esque “Down South,” the quick move to the ruminative is a good indication that for as good as Highway Companion can sound on the road, Petty looks inward on this album just as frequently as he looks outward. Perhaps this is the best indication that this is indeed a solo affair, not a rock & roll record with the Heartbreakers. Petty of course doesn’t go it completely alone here: his longtime guitarist Mike Campbell is here as is producer/co-writer Jeff Lynne, who helmed Petty’s 1989 solo debut, Full Moon Fever, and the Heartbreakers’ 1991 Into the Great Wide Open and now returns to the fold 15 years later. Lynne’s previous Petty productions were so bright, big, and shiny, they would have been suitable for an ELO album, and given that track record, it would be easy to assume that he would follow the same template for Highway Companion, but that’s not the case at all. Highway Companion has as much in common with the rustic, handmade overtones of 1994’s Wildflowers as it does with the pop sheen of Full Moon Fever — it is precise and polished, yet it’s on a small scale, lacking the layers of overdubs that distinguish Lynne’s production, and the end result is quite appealing, since it’s at once modest but not insular. But Highway Companion also feels a little off, as if Petty is striving to make a fun rock & pop record — a soundtrack for the summer, or at least a good drive — but his heart is in making a melancholy introspective album, where he’s grappling with getting older. This gives the album a sad undercurrent even at its lightest moments, which makes it ideal for driving alone late at night. Since it arrives after the bombastic The Last DJ, it’s refreshing to hear Petty underplay his themes here, and it also helps that Lynne helps toughen up his songcraft. All this makes Highway Companion at the very least another typically reliable collection from Petty, but at its core, it’s moodier than most of his records. It has a lot in common with Petty’s divorce album, Echo, but it’s coming from a different place — one that’s content, yet still unsettled. That may mean that this album isn’t quite as fun as it initially seems on the surface, but that bittersweet undercurrent does indeed make Highway Companion a good partner for long nights on the road. —Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 Saving Grace 03:47
2 Square One 03:26
3 Flirting With Time 03:13
4 Down South 03:26
5 Jack 02:27
6 Turn This Car Around 03:58
7 Big Weekend 03:15
8 Night Driver 04:27
9 Damaged By Love 03:22
10 This Old Town 04:15
11 Ankle Deep 03:22
12 The Golden Rose 04:44

Personnel:
Tom Petty – vocals, backing vocals, rhythm guitar, 12-string guitar, lead guitar, bass guitar, keyboards, electric piano, drums, harmonica
Mike Campbell – lead guitar, 12-string guitar, vibraphone
Jeff Lynne – rhythm guitar, bass guitar, keyboards, autoharp, backing vocals

Producer’s Note: Tom Petty Hi-Res Remastering :: The Hi-Res (24bit 96K) remastering of the Tom Petty catalog reveals a level of detail that was only previously heard by a select group of musicians, producers and engineers in the studio. It’s as close to the sound of original stereo master as you can get. We’re very happy with the way it came out, and believe it’s an important way to preserve the legacy of this great body of work.
If hearing the highest possible sound quality is important to you, then this is where you’ll get it.
The remastering was done in the fall of 2014 by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering. I supervised it and Tom approved it. Great care was taken to find the original first-generation masters and transfer them with minimal eq and little or no dynamic range compression. In cases where the first-generation masters were unusable, we used the best sounding second-generation masters.*
To allow for full dynamic range, and to let the music “breathe” the Hi-Res versions have about 6-8db less digital level than a typical “loud” peak-limited CD or mp3. To enjoy these albums to their fullest extent, play them back though a good system and turn up the volume.
With this increased level of detail and sonic impact, we hope you’ll enjoy rediscovering these great albums as much as we did! —Ryan Ulyate, April 2014

Continue reading »

Jul 25

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – The Last DJ (2002/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz  | Time – 00:47:56 minutes | 1,03 GB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: Qobuz | © Warner Bros. Records
Recorded: 2001–02 at Cello Studios, Hollywood, California

The Last DJ is the eleventh studio album by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. The tracks “The Last DJ”, “Money Becomes King”, “Joe”, and “Can’t Stop the Sun” are attacks on the greediness of the music industry. Although he first claimed that the album and title track were both works of fiction, Petty later admitted that both were inspired by Los Angeles DJ Jim Ladd, although he had already claimed this on Ladd’s radio show, prior to the album’s release.

A “limited edition” digipack version of the album was also released, including a DVD of music videos and other footage shot during the album’s production. The album reached #9 on the Billboard 200 aided by the single “The Last DJ” which hit #22 on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock Tracks in 2002. As of 2010, The Last DJ has sold 353,000 copies in the U.S. according to Nielsen SoundScan.

In an episode of The Simpsons titled “How I Spent My Strummer Vacation”, Homer receives song-writing lessons from Tom Petty, and in the original airing the track “The Last DJ” can be heard playing over the radio in the final scene. The song was changed for syndication. The song “Dreamville” is played at the end of the DVD that was released to commemorate the 2002 Anaheim Angels’ World Series win. The album also marks the return of original Heartbreaker Ron Blair on bass, replacing his own replacement, the ailing Howie Epstein. His return was late in the recording process however, and Petty and Campbell contribute most of the bass work themselves.

Tom Petty has always battled corporations and the music industry — fighting for lower retail prices for Hard Promises, complaining about videos, and always fighting for old-school, artist-first ’60s rock aesthetics. There’s a lot to admire about this stance, especially since he’s essentially right about corporations having too much of a stranglehold on pop music, but it doesn’t provide a solid foundation for an album, as the stultifying The Last DJ illustrates. Not every song on the record is about the death of rock & roll and the evils that corporations do, but it sure feels that way, since it begins with the one-two punch of “The Last DJ” and “Money Becomes King.” The former is a bitter lament for the loss of free thought in pop culture, using the DJ as a truth-telling seer; the latter is a rewrite of “Into the Great Wide Open,” all about a favorite artist who sells out. Both are didactic with their tortured metaphors and stretched narratives, but they seem subtle compared to the fourth song, “Joe,” a heavy-handed tirade about a record company CEO that is unbearable in its awful, vulgar lyrics and is rendered unlistenable by Petty’s hammy vocals; it is easily the worst song he’s ever written. These front-loaded tracks obscure the lovely “Dreamville,” the best song here, and effectively offer an early deathblow to an album that alternately finds Petty muddling through ballads and stumbling through rockers. Though his songcraft serves him well on occasion, it’s only on occasion — the aforementioned “Dreamville,” “You and Me,” “Have Love Will Travel” — and the record’s spare, black-and-white production doesn’t add color to compositions that need it. Throughout The Last DJ, Petty sounds utterly lost — and instead of liberating him like it did in the past, it paralyzes him, boxing him into a corner where he can’t draw on his strengths. It’s the first true flop in a career that, until now, had none. –Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 The Last DJ 3:31
2 Money Becomes King 5:12
3 Dreamville 3:46
4 Joe 3:16
5 When A Kid Goes Bad 4:51
6 Like A Diamond 4:35
7 Lost Children 4:29
8 Blue Sunday 2:56
9 You And Me 2:56
10 The Man Who Loves Women 2:53
11 Have Love Will Travel 4:06
12 Can’t Stop The Sun 4:52

Personnel:
Tom Petty – guitars, vocals, piano, ukulele, bass on “The Last DJ”, “Money Becomes King”, “Joe”, “Like a Diamond”, “Blue Sunday”, “You and Me”, and “Have Love Will Travel”
Mike Campbell – guitars, bass on “Dreamville”, “When A Kid Goes Bad”, and “The Man Who Loves Women”
Benmont Tench – piano, organ, various keyboards
Scott Thurston – guitar, lap steel guitar, ukulele, background vocals
Steve Ferrone – drums
Ron Blair – bass on “Lost Children” and “Can’t Stop The Sun”
Lenny Castro – percussion
Lindsey Buckingham – background vocals on “The Man Who Loves Women”
Jon Brion – orchestral arrangements and conducting

Producer’s Note: Tom Petty Hi-Res Remastering :: The Hi-Res (24bit 96K) remastering of the Tom Petty catalog reveals a level of detail that was only previously heard by a select group of musicians, producers and engineers in the studio. It’s as close to the sound of original stereo master as you can get. We’re very happy with the way it came out, and believe it’s an important way to preserve the legacy of this great body of work.
If hearing the highest possible sound quality is important to you, then this is where you’ll get it.
The remastering was done in the fall of 2014 by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering. I supervised it and Tom approved it. Great care was taken to find the original first-generation masters and transfer them with minimal eq and little or no dynamic range compression. In cases where the first-generation masters were unusable, we used the best sounding second-generation masters.*
To allow for full dynamic range, and to let the music “breathe” the Hi-Res versions have about 6-8db less digital level than a typical “loud” peak-limited CD or mp3. To enjoy these albums to their fullest extent, play them back though a good system and turn up the volume.
With this increased level of detail and sonic impact, we hope you’ll enjoy rediscovering these great albums as much as we did! —Ryan Ulyate, April 2014

Continue reading »

Jul 25

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Echo (1999/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96kHz | Time – 01:02:04 minutes | 1,29 GB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | © Warner Bros. Records
Recorded: 1997–98

Echo is the tenth studio album by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. First released in April 1999, the album reached #10 on the Billboard 200 aided by the singles “Free Girl Now,” “Swingin’” and “Room At The Top”, which hit #5, #17 and #19 respectively on Billboard ’​s Mainstream Rock Tracks in 1999. The album was the band’s last collaboration with producer Rick Rubin, and was also the last to feature contributions from longtime bassist/vocalist Howie Epstein, who died of a heroin overdose in 2003. Echo was certified Gold (500,000 copies sold) by the RIAA in July 1999, only three months after it was released. Echo is the only Heartbreakers’ album to contain a lead vocal from another member of the band: Mike Campbell on “I Don’t Wanna Fight.” An outtake entitled “Sweet William” appeared as the B-side (or second song) on the “Room at the Top” CD single.
Only certain songs were played on the band’s tour that year. The record was largely written during a period when Petty was going through a painful divorce (influencing the lyrics of songs such as “Lonesome Sundown” and the title track), and Petty has cited that as the reason for his preference not to play any songs from the album in concert. However, “Room at the Top”, “Free Girl Now” and “I Don’t Wanna Fight” all appear in the concert film “High Grass Dogs: Live at the Fillmore” and a version of “Billy the Kid” appears on “The Live Anthology”.

Although the stripped-down, immediate production of She’s the One was reminiscent of Wildflowers, Tom Petty’s forays into Lindsey Buckingham-inspired pop turned out to be a passing thing, since Echo, his first full-fledged record with the Heartbreakers since 1991’s Into the Great Wide Open, is an extension of Wildflowers, at least in terms of sound and feel. The weird thing is, Echo sounds like a sinewy band recording, but its sentiment makes it feel like a solo record. To be blunt, much of Echo feels like a by-product of Petty’s divorce from his wife of over 20 years; even the intoxicating hard rock of “Free Girl Now” has a layer of sorrow and regret. That weary melancholy is the bond that keeps Echo together, bridging the gap between the ballads and the rockers, providing an emotional touchstone that makes the record more than just another Petty record. Then again, the music on Echo manages to sound like every other Petty album, yet it stays fresh. Petty, Mike Campbell, and Rick Rubin (along with some help from George Drakoulias) keep the spirit of Wildflowers alive by keeping the production uncluttered, direct, and muscular — which just reveals what a strong, versatile band the Heartbreakers are. And while there are no surprises, Petty once again delivers an album that works as a whole while having several clear highlights — which is a pretty neat trick, actually. At times, the disc feels a little long, but all the pieces work individually and illustrate that Petty is the rare rocker who knows how to mature gracefully. Although the album is spiked with sadness and regret, nothing on the album feels forced or self-conscious, either lyrically or musically — and he is one of the few rockers of his generation that can make such a claim. –Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 Room At The Top 05:00
2 Counting On You 04:05
3 Free Girl Now 03:30
4 Lonesome Sundown 04:32
5 Swingin’ 05:29
6 Accused Of Love 02:45
7 Echo 06:36
8 Won’t Last Long 04:22
9 Billy The Kid 04:08
10 I Don’t Wanna Fight 02:48
11 This One’s For Me 02:42
12 No More 03:16
13 About To Give Out 03:14
14 Rhino Skin 03:57
15 One More Day, One More Night 05:40

Personnel:
Tom Petty – guitars, harmonica, vocals
Mike Campbell – lead guitars, bass, lead vocals on “I Don’t Wanna Fight”
Benmont Tench – pianos, organ, chamberlin, clavinet
Howie Epstein – bass, harmony/background vocals
Scott Thurston – acoustic and electric guitars, background vocals
Steve Ferrone – drums
Lenny Castro – percussion

Producer’s Note: Tom Petty Hi-Res Remastering :: The Hi-Res (24bit 96K) remastering of the Tom Petty catalog reveals a level of detail that was only previously heard by a select group of musicians, producers and engineers in the studio. It’s as close to the sound of original stereo master as you can get. We’re very happy with the way it came out, and believe it’s an important way to preserve the legacy of this great body of work.
If hearing the highest possible sound quality is important to you, then this is where you’ll get it.
The remastering was done in the fall of 2014 by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering. I supervised it and Tom approved it. Great care was taken to find the original first-generation masters and transfer them with minimal eq and little or no dynamic range compression. In cases where the first-generation masters were unusable, we used the best sounding second-generation masters.*
To allow for full dynamic range, and to let the music “breathe” the Hi-Res versions have about 6-8db less digital level than a typical “loud” peak-limited CD or mp3. To enjoy these albums to their fullest extent, play them back though a good system and turn up the volume.
With this increased level of detail and sonic impact, we hope you’ll enjoy rediscovering these great albums as much as we did! —Ryan Ulyate, April 2014

Continue reading »

Jul 25

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – She’s The One – Songs And Music From The Motion Picture (1996)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/44.1 kHz  | Time – 00:51:42 minutes | 611 MB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: Qobuz | © Warner Bros. Records
Recorded: 1992–96 at Sound City, Village Recorders and Andora Studios

Songs and Music From the Motion Picture “She’s the One” is the ninth studio album by American rock band Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, first released in August 1996. The album served as the soundtrack for the 1996 film She’s the One, written and directed by Edward Burns.

Songs and Music From the Motion Picture “She’s the One” peaked at #15 on the Billboard 200 albums chart and was certified gold by the RIAA in December 1996. The track “Walls (Circus)” peaked at #69 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #6 on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart. “Climb That Hill” also peaked at #6 on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart, while “Change The Locks” peaked at #20.

This album was not mentioned on the four-hour Petty documentary Runnin’ Down a Dream, though Tom could be seen doing a studio session of the song “Angel Dream (No. 4)”.

Nominally a soundtrack to Ed Burns’ film She’s the One, Tom Petty’s Songs and Music from “She’s the One” plays like an entity of its own, standing up quite well without the movie itself. She’s the One is one of Petty’s most relaxed efforts — several of the songs feel like they were written and performed quickly, almost as if they were throwaways, but that ramshackle feeling actually works in the album’s favor. With its loose ends, repeated songs, covers, brief instrumental bridges, and direct production, She’s the One is a ragged listen, but it’s a comfortable, engaging, and surprisingly eclectic one. Petty goes for a number of different moods, from the circular harmonies of “Walls (Circus)” (which features guest vocals from Lindsey Buckingham) and the hard-rocking “Zero from Outer Space” to the melancholy ruminations of “Grew Up Fast.” Along the way, he tosses in two excellent covers of contemporary songwriters — Lucinda Williams’ slyly sneering “Change the Locks” and Beck’s stark, sad “Asshole” — which are performed with affection and vigor. In fact, that vigor is what makes She’s the One so charming — Petty sounds like he’s having a good time throughout the album. It’s not a major statement in his catalog, but it’s all the more entertaining because of its simple, direct approach. –Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 Walls (Circus) 4:25
2 Grew Up Fast 5:10
3 Zero From Outer Space 3:08
4 Climb That Hill 3:58
5 Change The Locks 4:56
6 Angel Dream (No. 4) 2:28
7 Hope You Never 3:03
8 Asshole 3:11
9 Supernatural Radio 5:23
10 California 2:39
11 Hope On Board 1:19
12 Walls (No. 3) 3:03
13 Angel Dream (No. 2) 2:28
14 Hung Up And Overdue 5:49
15 Airport 0:58

Personnel:
Tom Petty – vocals, guitars, harmonica, piano, harpsichord, tympani
Mike Campbell – guitars, piano, Marxophone
Howie Epstein – bass, background vocals
Benmont Tench – organ, piano
Curt Bisquera – drums except on “Hung Up and Overdue”, “Hope You Never”, and “California”
Scott Thurston (uncredited) – guitar, harmonica, backing vocals, bass guitar, percussion[citation needed]Lindsey Buckingham – background vocals on “Walls (Circus)”, “Climb That Hill” and “Asshole”
With:
Ringo Starr – drums on “Hung Up and Overdue”
Steve Ferrone – drums on “Hope You Never” and “California”
Carl Wilson – gut string guitar, harmony vocals
Chris Trujillo – percussion
Lili Haydn – violin
Michael Severens – cello
Gerri Sutyak – cello

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Jul 25

Tom Petty – Wildflowers (1994/2014)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 01:02:36 minutes |  1,38 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download |  Source:PonoMusic |  Front cover
© Warner Bros. Records | Recorded: 1992–94 in Los Angeles, CA at Sound City and Ocean Way Recording

Wildflowers is the second solo album by American musician Tom Petty, released on the first of November, 1994. The album was the first released by Petty after signing a contract with Warner Bros. Records (where he had recorded as part of the Traveling Wilburys) and the first of three albums produced by Rick Rubin.
Three singles were released from the album between 1994 and 1995, the most successful of which, “You Don’t Know How It Feels”, reached #13 on the Billboard Hot 100 and topped the Album Rock Tracks chart for one week.

The album features all members of the Heartbreakers with the exception of drummer Stan Lynch. Steve Ferrone plays drums on Wildflowers and would join the band officially the following year. However, the album was not credited to the Heartbreakers because, in Petty’s words, “Rick (Rubin) and I both wanted more freedom than to be strapped into five guys.”[8] Freedom notwithstanding, Petty chose to use most of his regular band as session players, demonstrating his comfort with that format. Rolling Stone placed Wildflowers at number twelve on their list of the best albums of the nineties. Guitar World placed the album at number 49 in their “Superunknown: 50 Iconic Albums That Defined 1994” list.

Under the guidance of producer Rick Rubin, Tom Petty turns in a stripped-down, subtle record with Wildflowers. Coming after two albums of Jeff Lynne-directed bombast, the very sound of the record is refreshing; Petty sounds relaxed and confident. Most of the songs are small gems, but a few are a little too laid-back, almost reaching the point of carelessness. Nevertheless, the finest songs here (“Wildflowers,” “You Don’t Know How It Feels,” “It’s Good to Be King,” and several others) match the quality of his best material, making Wildflowers one of Petty’s most distinctive and best albums. –Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 Wildflowers 3:09
2 You Don’t Know How It Feels 4:47
3 Time To Move On 3:14
4 You Wreck Me 3:22
5 It’s Good To Be King 5:08
6 Only A Broken Heart 4:28
7 Honey Bee 4:57
8 Don’t Fade On Me 3:30
9 Hard On Me 3:46
10 Cabin Down Below 2:50
11 To Find A Friend 3:22
12 A Higher Place 3:54
13 House In The Woods 5:30
14 Crawling Back To You 5:03
15 Wake Up Time 5:17

Personnel:
Tom Petty – 12 and 6-string acoustic and electric guitars, harmonica, piano, organ, vocals
Mike Campbell – 6 and 12-string guitars (bass, slide, electric, acoustic), harpsichord, coral sitar
Benmont Tench – harmonium, pianos, organ, mellotron, zenon
Howie Epstein – supporting vocals, bass
Steve Ferrone – drums except on “To Find a Friend”
Michael Kamen – orchestration, conductor
Ringo Starr – drums on “To Find a Friend”
Lenny Castro – percussion
Phil Jones – percussion
John Pierce – bass
Jim Horn – saxophone on “House in the Woods”
Brandon Fields – saxophone on “House in the Woods”
Greg Herbig – saxophone on “House in the Woods”
Kim Hutchcroft – saxophone on “House in the Woods”
Marty Rifkin – pedal steel guitar on “House in the Woods”
Carl Wilson – background vocals on “Honey Bee”

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