Jul 24

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Hard Promises (1981/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96kHz | Time – 40:02 minutes | 861 MB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | © Geffen Records
Recorded: 1980–81 at Sound City, Van Nuys, Cherokee Studios, Hollywood, CA and Goodnight, LA

Exclusively on HDtracks, images of the master tapes are included with every download, along with a note from the remaster producer, Ryan Ulyate.

Hard Promises is the fourth album by the Heartbreakers was produced by Jimmy Iovine and Tom Petty and was recorded at Sound City in Van Nuys, CA and Cherokee Studios in Hollywood, CA. Both “The Waiting” and “A Woman In Love (It’s Not Me)” were released as singles.

Damn the Torpedoes wasn’t simply a culmination of Tom Petty’s art; it happened to be a huge success, enabling him to call the shots on its successor, Hard Promises. Infamously, he used his first album as a star to challenge the record industry’s practice of charging more for A-list artists, demanding that Hard Promises should be listed for less than most records by an artist of his stature, but if that was the only thing notable about the album, it would have disappeared like Long After Dark. Instead, it offered a reaffirmation that Damn the Torpedoes wasn’t a fluke. There’s not much new on the surface, since it continues the sound of its predecessor, but it’s filled with great songwriting, something that’s as difficult to achieve as a distinctive sound. The opener, “The Waiting,” became the best-known song on the record, but there’s no discounting “A Woman in Love (It’s Not Me),” “Nightwatchman,” “Kings Road,” “Insider,” and “The Criminal Kind,” album tracks that would become fan favorites. If Hard Promises doesn’t have the sweep of Damn the Torpedoes, that’s because its predecessor was blessed with good timing and an unusually strong set of songs. Hard Promises isn’t quite so epochal, yet it has a tremendous set of songs and a unified sound that makes it one of Petty’s finest records. —Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Tracklist:
1 The Waiting 03:58
2 A Woman In Love (It’s Not Me) 04:22
3 Nightwatchman 04:01
4 Something Big 04:44
5 Kings Road 03:24
6 Letting You Go 03:23
7 A Thing About You 03:31
8 Insider 04:23
9 The Criminal Kind 03:59
10 You Can Still Change Your Mind 04:17

Personnel:
Tom Petty – lead vocals, 12 & 6 string electric and acoustic guitars, bass guitar, electric piano
Mike Campbell – 12 & 6 string guitar, electric guitars, auto-harp, accordion, harmonium, bass guitar
Benmont Tench – organ, piano, backing vocals
Ron Blair – bass guitar
Stan Lynch – drums, backing vocals
Additional:
Phil Jones – percussion
Stevie Nicks – backing vocals
Donald “Duck” Dunn – bass guitar
Sharon Celani – backing vocals
Alan “Bugs” Weidel – piano

Producer’s Note: Tom Petty Hi-Res Remastering :: The Hi-Res (24bit 96K) remastering of the Tom Petty catalog reveals a level of detail that was only previously heard by a select group of musicians, producers and engineers in the studio. It’s as close to the sound of original stereo master as you can get. We’re very happy with the way it came out, and believe it’s an important way to preserve the legacy of this great body of work.
If hearing the highest possible sound quality is important to you, then this is where you’ll get it.
The remastering was done in the fall of 2014 by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering. I supervised it and Tom approved it. Great care was taken to find the original first-generation masters and transfer them with minimal eq and little or no dynamic range compression. In cases where the first-generation masters were unusable, we used the best sounding second-generation masters.*
To allow for full dynamic range, and to let the music “breathe” the Hi-Res versions have about 6-8db less digital level than a typical “loud” peak-limited CD or mp3. To enjoy these albums to their fullest extent, play them back though a good system and turn up the volume.
With this increased level of detail and sonic impact, we hope you’ll enjoy rediscovering these great albums as much as we did! —Ryan Ulyate, April 2014